Mojo Musings

Mojo Musings

Last week, Coach Kristie addressed the loss of Mojo in “Mojo, Mojo, Whereforeart Thou, Mojo“.  This week, KR Endurance athlete David Bess, discusses it from his perspective: I’ve trained as a “serious” runner for five or six years now, competing in numerous short-distance races as well as half and full marathons.  Along the way, my motivation level has waned and has at times even disappeared.  The newness of running is long gone, and the act of putting on the gear for one more run feels like drudgery rather than delight.  Here are a few thoughts that help me keep my motivation level up and the “mojo” present. Run to live, don’t live to run.  Running can easily consume me and dominate my life. When it starts taking the place of faith, family or relationships with friends, its gone too far.  Burnout for me then is just around the corner.  I have to keep it in perspective.  I run to live a better life, I don’t live to run a better race.  As fulfilling as running is, there are far greater things in life! Find the fun.  Running started as something fun and exciting, and I have to make sure I keep it that way.  If I get obsessed with a faster pace, a quicker finish time, or another new personal record, the pressure I put on myself robs me of the joy of running. There’s nothing wrong with having a goal, but I’ve got to find the fun in pursuing it. Do something rather than nothing at all.  If I just can’t bring myself to run, then find something else to...
Comparing Yourself to Others- by Coach Heather

Comparing Yourself to Others- by Coach Heather

What does it mean to be a “bad” athlete? To me there is no such thing. We are all human and want to be our best. We want to PR, improve, feel better, be leaner. We (including myself) can and at times are our own worst enemies. We compare ourselves to others and their times or what our times were prior to an injury or life happening. We check out where our competitors are and want to be at their level. We want to be back to where we were before life took over. We have to start where we are at. Not every race is going to go 100% as planned. Our bodies will fatigue, strategies don’t work out, etc. I am Training for 2018 Triathlon World Championships in Gold Coast, Australia.. It is an honor to be able to go as part of Team USA to race on behalf of the USA! My goal is to be in the top 10 in my age group. Last year, life took over and now my run times are a little slower. I had a few injuries but they happened for a reason. Do I want to be where I was at a 7 minute mile…absolutely. It’s going to take some work to get back there. I had a reality check by my Coach just yesterday. I want to compare myself to where I used to be instead of working on where I am at. I have to let go of the stresses of life and just take it one workout at a time and one day at a time....
Exercise of the Week:  Dolphin

Exercise of the Week: Dolphin

Coach Kristie demonstrates this week’s exercise of the week, Dolphin. This pose has been called the “forgotten pose” in yoga.  It isn’t used as much as it used to be.  It is an excellent strength and stability exercise.  It strengthens arms, core, lower back and legs.  Stretches the legs, arches and opens the chest and shoulders. Begin by placing forearms in front of you.  Close enough that the opposing hand can “hug” the other arm.  Then clasp hands in front.  Place feet down and slowly walk to the front of the mat.  Relaxed shoulders, pulling belly button in to your spine.  Coach Kristie is demonstrating a beginner level of this pose.  For increased difficulty the feet can be even closer to the front of the mat. Once in the start position drive forward moving the head and shoulders over the clasped hands.  Return to start position.  For increased difficulty you can drive forward and down, resting the top of your head on the mat between your arms.  Repeat this move working up to 20...
Exercise of the Week:  Hydration

Exercise of the Week: Hydration

This one bears repeating- guest blog from Dina Griffin on hydration: A couple of hot topics in the sport nutrition world lately relate to fluid and electrolyte needs for athletic individuals (no matter whether recreational or more elite in abilities). I want to address a few issues related to hydration in this article, some of which have also been questions previously posed by KRE teammates. Fluid and water recommendations for athletes have run the gamut in the context of daily needs and needs during exercise. As an example of this, check out the following list of recommendations that have circulated in recent years: 8 x 8-ounce glasses of water daily Drink 1/2 of your body weight in water daily Drink fluids until your pee is clear in color Drink fluids until your pee is pale in color Males: 15.5 cups of fluids; Females: 11 cups of fluids (Adequate Intake as set by the Institute of Medicine for healthy 19-70+ year-olds) 0.154 to 0.185 ounces of water per pound of body weight during exercise 3 to 8 oz of fluid every 15 minutes during exercise Drink ahead of thirst Drink to thirst Which one is right? The short answer is: none of them have been proven scientifically to be the “one and only way” for all healthy athletic individuals. What it really gets down to is figuring out what YOU need. Like most things when it comes to being an athlete, right? Before I present some hydration tips, let’s review some of the important benefits of hydration: 1. Aids in digestion and absorption of nutrients from the food we eat...
Exercise of the Week:  Back Hyperextensions

Exercise of the Week: Back Hyperextensions

Coach Kristie demonstrates this week’s Exercise of the Week:  Back Hyperextensions Having a strong lower back and core muscles will aid in the prevention of back pain and injury.  As your muscles get stronger, they are able to offer more support to your spine, which improves your posture, running form, and relieves pain. In the starting position, the body is face down, arms in the shape of a goal post.   Activate core muscles and lower back to lift the upper body and hold for a count of 2-5, then return to starting position.  That is one repetition.  The neck and shoulders should be relaxed, lower back and core muscles should be doing the lifting. Work up to 4 sets of 20 reps. Please feel to ask anyone on our coaching staff if you have any questions about this exercise of the...