Outlaw 140.6 race report 2017

Outlaw 140.6 race report 2017

Are you on the square, are you on the level? Are you ready to swear right here, right now, before the devil? Outlaw 140.6. My 4th iron distance and first non-branded event. I love this distance. Its not my strength – I do much better in 70.3s and shorter tris. The challenge of the distance keeps bringing me back, despite that most of the time during training I say to myself “this is my last one.” Funny side note – I have already registered for IMCA 2018. Leading into Outlaw, I had done IMCdA 70.3. I love the Coeur d’Alene course. It wasn’t my fastest 70.3 by any means. Even though it was a lead-in and I know better, I was a bummed to come in 8 minutes slower than when I did it last year. Last year it was my “A” race and the weather was not nearly as hot (it was 85 on the run this year, but I actually do ok in the heat so I can’t use that as any kind of excuse). I had a ton of fun out there and that’s what really matters most to me anyway. I came in at a respectable 5:32. I took a much more laid back approach to training this cycle. My goal was to get through it uninjured, mentally and physically. Physically, I did a great job. Mentally, well, hence the song lyrics at the beginning of this report. Let’s just say that song lyrics are like a mantra and I end up doing a lot of deep thinking during training, especially on the bike. The...
Believe You Can

Believe You Can

There’s a popular nutrition podcast I listen to. The host often says “there’s no free lunch in nature.” I love this saying, and I find that it goes for training as well. There is no free lunch in running and triathlon. What do I mean by this, exactly? Well, specifically this…races aren’t going to train for themselves. Signing up for races is fun. It gives athletes a little endorphin boost which feels good. Now what? Whether you’re a beginner or have been racing for years, you gotta train. Hiring a coach can help. Having guidance and accountability is useful during training. Someone is there to answer questions, and figure out the best plan for each athlete as an individual. Everyone is different. Each athlete is like a puzzle and the coach can help fit the pieces together, creating a picture of a successful, goal-meeting race day. Regardless of the distance, training for a race can seem a little daunting. For some, a 5k is that distance. For others, its a 70.3. Whatever “your” goal race distance, the first place to start is believing that you can do it. We live in a wonderful world full of all kind of gear, gadgets, GPS, heart rate monitors, power meters and sensors. All these things are useful in tracking metrics for training. But you know what is equally, if not more important? The athlete’s belief in themselves that they can train for and successfully complete the event. Humans can have a tendency to make things complicated and its important to occasionally take a step back, look at the fundamentals, and be sure...