Exercise of the Week:  Wall Sits

Exercise of the Week: Wall Sits

Coach Kristie demonstrates the Exercise of the Week: Wall Sits. Walls sits are a great bodyweight exercise to strengthen the quadriceps and calves.   This exercise can be done anywhere, home, office, gym or hotel room while traveling. Sit against a wall, legs bent at a 90-degree angle. Activate the core to assist in supporting the upper body. To increase difficulty, raise arms and place hands behind the ears. Start by 3 sets of 30 seconds. Gradually increasing time of each and lessening rest times in between sets to aim for a continuous wall...
Exercise of the Week:  Isometric Glute

Exercise of the Week: Isometric Glute

Coach Rebecca demonstrates the exercise of the week. Isometric glute. Great for the glutes, especially glute medial. Lie on your side as shown, with a resistance band around the calves. Lift the top leg and hold 20-30 seconds. As you get stronger, use heavier bands. Start with 2-3 holds, each side....
Exercise of the Week:  Supine Hamstring Stretch

Exercise of the Week: Supine Hamstring Stretch

Coach Rebecca demonstrates the exercise of the week. Supine hamstring stretch. Lay on your back with your hands on your thigh as shown. Slowly extend the leg and feel a gentle stretch in the hamstring. Hold 20-30 seconds. Runners tend to have weak and tight hamstrings, this is a great stretch to incorporate daily....
Race Fueling:  Engineered Nutrition vs. Whole Foods by Dina Griffin, MS, RD, CSSD, METS II, Sports Dietician

Race Fueling: Engineered Nutrition vs. Whole Foods by Dina Griffin, MS, RD, CSSD, METS II, Sports Dietician

A commonly asked question these days by runners is “Can I eat real food instead of sports nutrition products?”. There are numerous options for fueling your runs, so let’s explore a few considerations in more detail to help you decide what is right for you. First, let’s clarify what is meant by “engineered foods”. Technically, this would be any kind of sports nutrition product such as gels, chews, beans, blocks, powdered drink mixes, and bars. In contrast, “whole foods” can include fruits or dried fruits, potatoes, homemade chia gels, or sandwiches.  Some foods can fall into both categories. For example, certain nutrition bars that contain few ingredients without fillers or artificial ingredients may be considered more of a whole food option. As to what is right for you, here are some considerations to ponder: What do you tolerate best?  Aside from having unique flavor preferences, some of us have stomachs and guts that simply do not tolerate certain kinds of calorie sources. If you cannot chew and run at the same time, you may want to rely on liquid calorie sources which typically will be a sports nutrition powdered formula.  Depending on run intensity, you can take nibbles of solid food to get needed calories and satisfy hunger. Beware that during your runs, it is not the time to consume much protein or fat-containing foods (ultra runners can be an exception to this) as these macronutrients slow down how quickly any carbohydrate will be digested. Also know that the very act of running can cause gastrointestinal (GI) distress when consuming calories (and especially when over–consuming calories!) due to the...